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today as one of those troubled reactors in japan. why this could be the worst thing we've hed so far. we'll be right back. i was diagnosed with copd. i could not take a deep breath i noticed i was having trouble. climbing the stairs, working in the garden, painting. my doctor suggested spiriva right then. no announcer: spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled maintenance treatment for copd, which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. love what it does. it opens up the airways. announcer: spiriva does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. stop taking spiriva and call your doctor right away if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, have vision changes or eye pain, g or have problems passing urine. tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, problems passing urine, as or an enlarged prostate, as these may worsen with spiriva. also, discuss the medicines you take, even eye drops. ip side effects include dry mouth, constipation, and trouble passing urine. th it makes me breathe easier. i can't do everything i used to do. but there's a lot i
. frightening moments for some workers at that troubled nuclear power plant in japan. what made them flee for their lives. >>> searching for spring. unseasonably cold weather puts a chill on the cherry blossoms and many areas of this country. >>> and summer breeze. why it might be a whole lot easier to find a summer job in twlechbt. >>> good morning, everyone, i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc sunday." let's get to what's happening right now beginning with new this morning. robert gates says the obama administration has no plans to remove gadhafi from power using military force. instead top u.s. officials are working diplomatic channels to try and push the dictator o. hiarcltoonme t a very clear message to gadhafi, but we're also sending a message to people around him. do you really want to be a pariah? do you really want to end up in the international criminal court? now is your time to get out of this and to help change the direction. >> mike viqueira, good sunday morning to you. >> reporter: good morning action al alex. >> what else are we hearing? >> reporter: critics say there's somet
now go to anderson cooper with "ac 360" live from japan. >>> piers, it is truly an extraordinary development to find somebody alive eight days, particularly remarkable when you consider so many of the injuries and the deaths we've seen were caused by that tsunami with all that debris and fast moving water. remarkable that this person apparently survived that long. and also with freezing cold temperatures at night. we'll try to find out more details on that. also the latest on the nuclear emergency that is ongoing right now. in the fukushima daiichi plant. the latest information on that is that the japanese government is finally admitting that the situation has indeed been worse than previously acknowledged. the government giving a grimmer assessment of the disaster, raising the threat level to level five out of seven, conceding it is worse than they previously said, something america's top nuclear regulator has been saying for two days. the wind had been blowing out to sea. it is now blowing on shore. we'll tell you what that means for cities like tokyo. according to "the new yor
: now to japan. a u.n. expert says radiation continues to leak from those damaged nuclear reactors but progress is being made. all six reactors are now hooked up to power lines-- a step toward getting the cooling systems working once the electricity is turned on the number of workers at the plant is now up to a thousand. meanwhile, the official death toll from the earthquake and tsunami is approaching 10,000 with nearly 14,000 missing. more than a quarter million survivors have no homes or have been forced to leave them. from japan tonight, here's lucy craft. >> reporter: cardboard houses now home for thousands living on the floor of a sports arena outside tokyo. all survived the tsunami and quake only to be caught up in a radiation scare. this fifth grader says "we escaped to my school but when they said even that was not safe, we came here." natives of iwaki like to boast about its postcard scenery and mild climate. the now notorious fukushima nuclear plant only 30 miles away has triggered a mass exodus. "from all sides everyone kept telling us get out of here" says this beautici
>> couric: tonight, two weeks into japan's disaster and it just keeps getting worse. the death toll passes 10,000 and now there may be a breach in one of the nuclear reactors. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the united states may be giving up command of the libya mission, but american forces will still be playing a major role in the operation. the fire that woke up the country to dangers in the workplace. and a population explosion. the colorful comeback of the monarch butterfly. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. japan's prime minister says the nuclear crisis is far from over and the goal right now, he says, is simply to keep it from getting worse. but it did today with a possible breach of one of the reactors. it was two weeks ago that they were damaged when a magnitude nine earthquake shook northern japan and triggered a tsunami. the official death toll passed the 10,000 mark today. 17,000 people are still missing. and now the japanese government has expande
concerns tonight about radiation in japan coming from those damaged nuclear reactors. trace amounts have now been picked up by air monitors in hawaii as well as stations in california, oregon, washington and colorado. authorities say it poses no threat to health. but in the quake zone in japan, the danger from radiation appears to be growing. nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell reports. >> obviously things are not contained completely at this time. >> reporter: there are serious new concerns about reactor 3 at the fukushima site, which uses highly toxic plutonium in its fuel mixture. japanese officials now say there is a high possibility that the third reactor's fuel rods are damaged and it is leaking radioactive water from the reactor itself or from the pumping system being used to try to cool it. there are also concerns about high levels of radiation at 1 and 2. japan's prime minister called the situation grave and says it does not allow any optimism yet. the problem at reactor 3 was discovered when workers stepped into water that had 10,000 times the amount of radiation ty
radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? >>> plus with hispanics making up 1 in every 6 americans and one in every 1 ever 4 children, the huge emphasis on the 2012 election. >>> finally, how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard when people like michele bachmann, sarah palin and donald trump are taking up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent d geis bghi, afr heldg up of da. whatapnetoy t ou ilia atoue en >> reporter: today we went out of benghazi. and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajdabiya. ajdabiya is partially held by gadhafi forces and partially held by the rebels themselves. there is street-to-street fighting in the city. in a way, this is progress, the rebels would not have been able to get this far if gadha
america. >>> in japan, new problems at the country's crippled nuclear complex are overshadowing some success at cooling the plant's overheated reactors over the weekend. there had been some optimism. this morning, workers at the facility were evacuated after gray smoke rose from the spent storage pool at the plant's number three reactor. it development comes after officials said they had successfully restored water pumps to two other reactors, putting them under control in a state known as a cold shutdown. the crisis, far from over with the discovery of radiation-tainted vegetables and tap water adding to public fears about contaminated food and drink. all that as officials now predict the death toll there in japan will exceed 18,000 from the earthquake and tsunami that followed. the situation in japan has raised questions in the u.s. energy secretary steven chu weighed in on a controversial nuclear reactor in new york city. >> we'll have to look at weather the reactor should remain. again, i don't want to jump to some judgment about what we should do going forward. the nrc will be l
in japan where today a radiation misreading at the fukushima plant sparked panic as well as evacuation. officials are now calling it a big mistake. charles hadlock is covering the latest developments from nearby, a safe distance, we should note, in south korea. charles, that misreading sparked another evacuation at the plant earlier today. are workers back inside? what is the status at fukushima daiichi right now? >> reporter: well, it was a major miscalculation, peter. a worker was reading the gauges and misrepresented what he saw. he reported he saw a spike of radiation equal to 10 million times what is normal. that turned out to be a miscalculation, and the tokyo electric company, the operators of the fukushima plant, had to back off and say, wait a minute, that's a miscalculation. it's not that bad. it is bad but not that bad. now, how bad is it? well, that water, that pool of water that is around the four reactors there is so radioactive that some radiologists tell me that workers standing in the water for one hour is exposed to four times his annual amount of radiation. so is tha
cuisinart. >> caught on air, disaster in japan, 11:00 p.m. eastern eastern on msnbc. you can have the last word online at our blog, and follow my tweets at lawrence. "the rachel maddow show" is up next. sitting in tonight, chris haze. good evening. >> good evening. thank you for staying with us the next hour. rachel has the night off. >>> the nuclear crisis in japan is still volatile tonight. there have been numerous developments today. we'll get to those shortly. we begin with something you should never have to ask, something that should never be a question. are we at war? yes, we are at war in iraq and afghanistan, and maybe sort of in pakistan as well. but are we at war again in another middle eastern country? it is not a provocative rhetorical question, it is one so-called no fly zone over libya and to take all necessary measures to protect civilians under attack. faced with threat from moammar gadhafi of a massacre of his own civilians, united nations approved military action against libya, which is a big fricking deal. for us, for the united nations, for the region. yet what
, will be david gregory's guests. we take you to japan. nuclear crisis getting worse. officials saying they believe there's a breach in the reactor core of unit number three at the damaged fukushima plant. what that means is that more radiation than first thought could be leaking right now. the suspected breach found when two workers were burned whi eed wading into water, 10,000 times more radioactive than normal. there may be a crack in the core or the spent fuel rod pool. all work has since stopped at the plant and japan's prime minister is saying the situation is very grave and the government is not in a position to be optimistic. joining me live from seoul, soesoe soek. >> reporter: good afternoon, as you say, the government did announce today that they -- what they think is happening is there there is a leak. they were cautious not to use the word breach because they're not clear where the source is coming from that affected the workers that you mentioned who were hospitalized yesterday. two of those workers, there were three altogether hospitalized, two of the workers were sent o
's happening. fallout, more traces of radiation found in america from that crippled nuclear plan in japan. is the threat to the u.s. and the world growing? murderous attacksing libyan forces answer president obama's address with a new round of attacks on civilians, according to the rebels. >>> and camelot, it's not. the new miniseries on jfk and jackie o., many historians say it's more fiction than fact. we speak to the producer 0 of the series ahead. >>> good afternoon. we begin with the disaster in japan where the prime minister says the country is in a stalts of maximum alert, this as the fukushima crisis worsens. japan officials have said they believe there's been a partial meltdown at three of the plants' six reactors, that's half. now today radioactive water has been discovered in the maintenance tunnel at the plant. in a a spatefrtepha fr l io ocns e nd ncte peltoeer he nnoced 2 etrothor nd, stonrm plonm seepifr the damaged nuclear power plant into the soil outside the facility. plutonium is years. but so far, officials claim the levels found are not harmful to human health. meanw
,000 people there. meanwhile in japan, another set back in the effort to control the japanese doubled fukushima plant. there are high levels of radioactive elements in the water there. there is more efforts to pump fresh water in the reactor there. dominic? >>reporter: uma, that's right. u.s. forces and japan getting involved. the navy has two naval barges loaded with 550,000 gallons of fresh water to be pumped in the plant. they are making it up to deliver the water. the united states air force is using c130 to deliver 500 tons was freshh bottled water up to sendai, close to the plantt where there are difficulties getting uncontaminated supplies of water and helping out the public there. the air force based out of the air base west of tokyo, home to 306,000 servicemen who are caught up in this as much as the japanese citizens. >> japp -- japan is our ally and our home. when something happen to japan and we are able to help we are glad to. we raised our hands to say yes, we can help you out. >> the utilit company said the water is contained. but the government is not sure if they are
. >> hill: need some patience. all right, rebecca, thanks (japan today, the prime minister said his nation is on maximum alert because of the crippled nuclear plant. today two workers were soaked by radioactive water that somehow got through their waterproof suits. they were decontaminated, they were not seriously hurt. meantime, a report, though, came out today that plant officials were warned as far back as 2007 that a tsunami could overwhelm the plant's flood defenses. those officials failed to act. safety procedures are also under review at u.s. nuclear plants, but former employees at one plant in california tell us their warnings were ignored. that's ahead. an up next, the maker of a drug to prevent premature births delivers a massive price hike. hey, pete. yeah, it's me, big brother. put the remote down and listen. [ male announcer ] this intervention brought to you by niaspan. so you cut back on the cheeseburgers and stopped using your exercise bike as a coat rack. that's it? you're done? i don't think so. you told me your doctor's worried about plaque clogging your arteries -- what
in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days, and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in libya. we begin our coverage with cbs news correspondent mandy clark, who is in ajdabiya this morning. mandy, good to see you. >> good morning. well, the streets of ajdabiya are relatively quiet at the moment. b
concerns about drinking water in japan. the government warning radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant has made tap water unsafe for babies. the u.s. air force bringing in more supplies to help with recovery operations there. >> the military is -- we are here to try and help people. this is a national disaster. we are here to work with the japanese people to start reconstruction and get sendai and other parts of japan's feet on the ground again. bill: the american relief effort includes 13,000 personnel, 20 ships and 140 aircraft. k.t. macfarland said the u.s. military is the first responders to the world. we found that in japan. heather: in the state of nevada, it has the largest share of illegal workers in the country. it also has the highest unemployment rate at 14%. are the illegals making a bad situation worse? anita vogel is joining us from los angeles. tell us about this new report. >> reporter: good morning. it lists the top states with the highest share of illegal immigrants in the labor pool. you mentioned nevada was the number one state with a 10% share of illegal immi
and bradley manning to the obvious. japan. how officials there ignored alarms about the possibility of a massive quake setting off a nuclear crisis that go back years. are these black swans that keep befalling us truly as unforeseen as everyone would want us to believe? how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com. plus, get the best deal or we'll pay you $1,000. call lending tree at... today. >>> turning our attention to japan, setbacks at the fukushima nuclear plant there. smoke started rising from reactor three amid fresh concerns about food and water supplies in the area. residents being warned not to drink the tap water and the government has banned shipments of milk and spinach from the region after radiation was detected but could all of this have been prevented? this man had been warnin
evacuation wasn't accurate. after an error like that, can information from japan about the nuclear reactors be trusted? budget battle. at the beginning of the 112 congress, two freshmen from opposite sides of the aisle promise to work together but with another budget battle looming, can they do it? we talk to the two lawmakers again live. all of that, plus a scandal involving the new york city fire department. should the city be forced to pay money to those who couldn't pass the entrance exam? i'm breech breech and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now -- i'm shannon bream and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now. we begin in japan. the spike in radiation level that led to evacuation was just a mistake. we have the latest. >> reporter: it was a breach coming from the authorities this sunday and we heard an official say that the radiation in water at the plant went to 10 million levels, that would be a catastrophic meltdown scenario numbers. fortunately, it was nowhere near that. radiation levels in the water have spiked four
. >>> there are new radiation concerns in japan this morning. the country's nuclear crisis stretches into the third week. officials said today that highly radioactive iodine seeping from the fukushima nuclear complex may be making its way into seawater north of the plant. mounting obstacles like inadequate storage tanks where efforts have been hindered to bring the facility back from disaster. the water must be removed and safely stored before work can continue to power up the cooling system. they just don't know how long that's going to take before they can get the workers into the plant. adding to the sense of unease across japan, a strong earthquake shook the region today and prompted a brief tsunami alert. measured a magnitude 6.5 and no damage or injuries were reported. radiation from japan appears to have reached as far as the u.s. east coast at least in trace amounts. one sample of massachusetts rainwater registered very low concentrations of radiation. officials say it does not pose a health risk. very latest, let's bring in nbc's lee cowan in tokyo. what's the latest there? >> reporter: we
workers from japan's crippled nuclear power plant ended up in the in the hospital today. they sustained beta ray radiation burns to their legs. they're part of a three-man team working to restore cooling systems at reactor three. smoke could be seen rising from those reactors again. >>> japan's considering bringing in bottled water from overseas. panicked shoppers have cleaned out stores across tokyo after officials warned yesterday not to give tap water to infants. officials say radiation levels in tap water are now back to normal. >>> the u.s. ambassador to japan visited an evacuation center in miyagi prefecture, the hardest hit by the quake and tsunami. it's believed miyagi alone lost 15,000 people. >>> nbc's lee cowan has the latest now from the region. he's in seoul, south korea. lee, good day to you. >> reporter: hey, contessa. yeah, every day, as we've been talking about all week, the death toll seems to climb here. we're now up to nearly 9,700 people that are confirmed dead, nearly 17,000 missing. some 250,000 people remain homeless and another 300,000 are still living in shelte
that have happened around the world, it is facing more conflict plus japan which may be the largest issue that we're facing. >> andrea, it is unbelievable. i repeated to him, the associated press lead, we were on the air doing wrap-up from his speech the other night and they obviously had this set to go. they hit send. and their lead contained the words president obama defended the first war launched on his watch. i left the interview and you've been around this so many times yourself, and i passed through what i called the machinery of the presidency. the security, the aides, there was the tall air force officer serving as the military de you look at his feet. there is theootbal all of the people flew in with him. he has these three plates, balancing on sticks right now. americans in uniform fighting on at least three fronts. that leaves out special forces that are dug into places we can't imagine. and it is quite a world view, i guess, and are we entering this period of kind of ad libbed on the fly foreign policy where these nations are changing in north africa and the middle east befor
ravaged nuclear plant in japan. earlier, workers at that site reported a massive spike in radioactive water in the cooling system. perhaps ten million times as higher than normal, but now plant operators conceding that extremely high reading was wrong. let's go to dominic streaming live from osaka, japan. >> reporter: gregg, they are having extreme problems with highly radioactive water at the four of six troubled reactors. this radioactive water has seeped into buildings around the reactors which is making the job more difficult. up until yesterday, which was sunday japan time for a monday morning, they were actually able to access certain parts and get close to the core as possible to. radioactive water spread to other parts. because workers can only go in for 15 minutes due to the health and safety levels it's making the job doubly difficult. they are not sure where the source has come from. is it the result of the water being sprayed in and actually diluted a lot of the other radioactive water? is it coming from somewhere? they don't know. until they can actually start to drain so
: u.s. navy is rushing to deliver fresh water to japan's damaged nuclear plant to replace the corrosive sea water to try to cool the overheated reashh. fear is the sea water could further compromise efforts to stabilize the reactors. all of this coming as another spike in radiation. japanese government spokesperson the efforts of plant's workers seem to be keeping from the situation getting worse but it's too soon to be optimistic. >> heather: tea party helped the republicans win the house but house speaker john boehner is feeling the heat from some in the tea party movement. tea party nation sounder, he is accusing the speaker of a breaking a pledge to slash spending so he is pushing for a primary opponent against boehner. here is managing editor of the hill. thank you for joining us. let's get off the top, judson phillips he as bull's-eye on the speaker of the house. he says he is a compromised too much when it comes to spending. in your opinion should speaker boehner be concerned and what sort of fracture is this creating on capitol hill? >> she going to win his next re
reactors at japan's krip crippled nuclear plant temperature. they say there is still a lot of work to be done before electricity can be turned on. emergency crews dumped 18 tons of seawater into a nearly boiling pool holding spent nuclear fuel. japan's nikkei market closed with more than a 4% gain today thanks to the good news at the power plant. the index is still 7% lower than its close the day the earthquake and tsunami hit. >>> crews recovered the body of taylor anderson, an american teaching english in miyagi, japan, believed to be the first american victim, the first known one of the quake and tsunami. they estimate miyagi prefecture lost 15,000 people. >>> nbc's lee cowan is live now in seoul, south of korea. what's the story now? what's the situation with fear and whether it is dissipating in that region? >> reporter: i think there is still a lot of fear, it depends on where you are. if you are talking in the north, you are still focused so much on the search and rescue effort. it is still officially search and rescue. they go through the rebel with sticks trying their best
unbelievable, this happening at once. historic moment with the vast uncertainties. >>> coming up, in japan, a frightening forecast for one of those damaged nuclear reactors. we'll go live to tokyo. >>> frightening news out of japan as it appears the nuclear core reactor number three may be leaking radioactive material. workers near the reactor detected radiation 10,000 times stronger than normal. savidge is in tokyo. what are you hearing? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, as you point out, the government greatly concerned about the, is that may be going on at reactor number three. we've got an image to show you. it's a graphic. basically here's the problem -- they think that the water levels with the radiation they found, 10,000 times, as you say, above normal in the case that this is perhaps a leak coming from the core of the reactor. that particular reactor of all six that are out there is the most dangerous because it has mixed fuel. it's the only one that does. a mixture of uranium and plutonium, that's very dangerous stuff. meanwhile, overnight, though, the government also said yo
of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way. how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard if people like michele bauchmann, sarah palin, and donald trump suck up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent richard engel is in benghazi after a heralding couple of days. what happened today on the ground in libya that you've seen? >> reporter: tdaye went out of benghazi and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajd
much. >> thank you, andrea. >>> now to the latest to the crisis in japan. police there say the official death toll now has reached 9,800 people. 17,500 people still remain missing. two workers are trying to stabilize the fukushima nuclear power plant, two of those workers were injured when they stepped into radioactive water and were hospitalized, but authorities say that they were exposed to levels below the maximum allowed for plant workers. >>> the u.s. military has more than 19,000 marines and sailors, 20 ships, 140 aircrafts assisting with relief efforts in japan. and in a surprise move, north korea is helping out as well. kim jong-il has sent $500,000 million for relief for ethnic koreans living in japan. >>> today, tokyo's drinking water has been deemed safe again, a day after radiation levels sent many scrambling for bottled water. but some of the neighboring communities around tokyo are now reporting increased radiation levels. nbc' lee cowan is live for us in so seoul, south korea. the improvement, a day forward -- one step forward, two steps back. it seems not only the radiat
of the disaster in japan. this is another day of setbacks at the troubles fukushima plachblt a high radiation reading sparked another reaction. officials, however, say this was all a mistake. nbc's charles hadlock is joining us from nearby seoul with the last. they were off by a couple of zeros but obviously this is not comfortable forring in northbound in that region, charles. >> reporter: no, it's not. just a few away and then you have this problem. what happened today, a worker at the plant looked at his gauge and it said that the radiation level was 10 million times higher than normal. an immediate evacuation of the workers was called for and later tokyo electric officials said that was a miscalculation that the radiation level was not that high. in fact, they say now that the radiation level is knew about 100,000 times more than normal, certainly less than what was reported earlier. but also very high. and that's the problem. there's radiated water on that site. the problem is what to do with it. how do you get it out of there, and do you work around it. that's what they're trying to fig
>>> a suspected breach at the reactor core of one of the crippled nuclear plants. japan's prime minister calls the situation grave and serious. a sea of protesters in yemen with demonstrators demanding their leader leave now. what does all this mean for the u.s. war on terror? >>> asleep in the tower. troubling questions about who is keeping watch at the nation's other airports as officials now confirm an air traffic controller was napping on the job. >>> it's friday. so do you have your office beer ready? apparently booze in the workplace is making a comeback. could it actually make us more productive? >>> we begin with the devastate nug develop in japan, radioactive contamination from the troubled fukushima nuclear power plant more severe than first thought. japan's prime minister spoke just a short time ago, calling the situation there very grave and serious. nuclear safety officials now suspect a dangerous breach in the core of a reactor. the evacuation zone has expanded from a 12-mile radius. people who are up to 19 miles mr. the plant are being told to leave. >>> also this
are overwhelmed. >>> in sendai, japan, there are signs of recovery. u.s. marines are busy there helping to clear away cars and other debris left in the tsunami's wake. >> we've been clearing it for the past few days, so we're making good progress. >>> let's head to tokyo and nbc's lee cowan who's developing stories there. >> reporter: it all stems from the injuries to the workers we talked about yesterday, the ones that were in the basement level of unit number three. they were trying to strip a cable there. they came in contact with radioactive water and had to be taken to the water. they were actually transferred to a hospital here in tokyo today so they could monitor their condition a little more closely. the consider is that the radiation levels were so high, and the water they stepped in, some 10,000 times that it should be, that the fear is now there is some kind of leak at the reactor itself. they don't know whether it's an actual breach in the core or the pipes themselves that are leaking but something is leaking. we don't know how much or how long it's been leaking and we don't know why
nuclear plant in japan after water inside tested 10,000 times more radioactive than normal. and this morning officials are expanding the voluntary evacuation zone. we'll have the latest in a live report. >>> wake-up call. the f.a.a. suspends a veteran tower controller after he fell asleep during his overnight shift at reagan national airport. it could lead to major safety changes nationwide. >>> final wish. elizabeth taylor laid to rest during an emotional private service and at her request she arrived fashionably late. one last grand entrance for a hollywood legend today, friday sh mar, hollywood legend today, friday sh mar, march 25, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> and good morning. welcome to "today" on a friday morning. i'm mcalistatt lauer. >> i'm ann curry. just a short time ago japan's prime minister delivered an address to his nation issuing an apology to farmers and businesses damaged by the nuclear crisis. he's been thanking the so-called fukushima 50r, the workers who stayed inside the plant trying to cool the reactors. >> the most recent
from japan. officials there now worried about a possible breach at one of those damaged reactors. if a crack or hole isun i ulme mhor r s re evusug authorities grew concerned when two workers suffered burns after they waded into water that turned out to be 10,000 at the plant to a halt today. japan's prime minister calls the situation grave and serious. in the meantime, the death from the quake and tsunami now over 10,000 with more than 17,000 people still missing. >>> meanwhile the crisis in the middle east has prices near $105 a barrel today. and prices will likely be here for a while. economists expect prices to remain high, hovering around the $100 per barrel mark through at least 2013. before the revolution in egypt, oil was trading under $90 a barrel. so how much will these high oil prices drag on our economic recovery? and could it prompt americans to cut back or even rethink our approach to energy entirely? joining me now, an oil trader at the mercantile exchange. he's also author of this new book "oil's endless bid." welcome, dan. what's the right way to think about thes
so much for joining us. >> thank you. >>> and when we come back, radiation fears in japan. a tap water warning issues for infants in tokyo. >>> and the world loses a lenl jend. we look at the life of dame elizabeth taylor as colorful off screen as it was on. homeowners -- rates have been going up, but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com. plus, get the best deal or we'll pay you $1,000. call lending tree at... today. her morning begins with arthritis pain. that's a coffee and two pills. the afternoon tour begins with more pain and more pills. the evening guests arrive. back to sore knees. back to more pills. the day is done but hang on... her doctor recommended aleve. just 2 pills can keep arthritis pain away all day with fewer pills than tylenol. this is lara who chose 2 aleve and fewer pills for a day free of pain. and get the all day pain relief of aleve in liquid gels. you struggle to control your blood sugar. you exercise and eat right, but your blood sugar may still be high, and you need extra help. ask your doctor about onglyza, a once
very much. and the latest on the situation in japan, including an interactive photo blog just go to our website. still ahead, one heck of a fast food fight. a customer goes wild when she gets tired of waiting. and a mother is facing charges after allegedly encouraging her 14-year-old son to get into a fistfight so she could video tape it. all righty then. castrol syntec has been reformulated for better performance under the hood. so we gave it a new name. castrol edge with syntec power technology. new name. better formula. it's more than just oil. it's liquid engineering. add listerine® total care for more complete oral care. ♪ it works in six different ways to restore enamel, strengthen teeth, freshen breath, help prevent cavities, and kill bad breath germs for a whole mouth clean. so go beyond the brush with listerine® total care. the most complete mouthwash. and for visibly whiter teeth, try listerine® total care plus whitening. and for visibly whiter teeth, how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups
in the battle to prevent radiation from leaking from the nuclear reactor in japan. the news comes just a day after safety officials say they suspect a dangerous breach in the core of one reactor. workers are now switching to fresh water as they try to cool the reactors. they say the salty sea water they were using before could cause corrosion and clog up pipes. barges are helping to bring in more fresh water. and new numbers on the extent of the tragedy. the official death toll has surpassed 10,000 with 17,000 people who remain missing. nbc's lee cowen is live for us in tokyo. what are officials say about the high radiation levels detected in the sea waters near the plant? that has to be cause for concern. >> it is, alex. it's still below levels they say are harmful, but it's the second time the radiation levels have spiked and this time it's more than 1,000 times what it should be. that's going to spark monitoring systems along the coastline far more than the systems that are already in place. the higher than normal concentration of iodine in sea water is the latest worry for those struggli
have been saved. meanwhile as we speak, our troops are supporting our ally japan, leaving iraq to its people, stopping the taliban's momentum in afghanistan, and going after al qaeda all across the globe. as commander-in-chief, i am grateful to our soldiers, sai r sailors, airmen, marines, coast guardsmen and to their families. and i know all americans share in that sentiment. for gene h anchor of global security and as an advocate of human freedom. mindful of the risks and costs of military action, we are naturally reluctant to use force to solve the world's many challenges. but when our interests and values are at stake, we have a responsibility to act. that's what's happened in libya over the course of these last six weeks. libya sits directly between tunisia and egypt. two nations that inspired the world when their people rose up to take control of their own destiny. for more than four decades, the libyan people have been ruled by a tyrant, moammar gadhafi. he has denied his people freedom, exploited their wealth, murdered opponents at home and abroad, and terrorized innocent peo
have banned food coming from japan amid fears it's tainted with radiation. taiwan joins singapore, new zealand and the u.s. there's also concern about america's nuclear plants. there are 104 in the u.s. thethose plants. they explain almost 30% of those plants failed to report equipment defects that can pose, quote, substantial safety risks. according to the report, there were 24 such instances in a 10-month period between 2009 and 2010. the inspector general says it prevents regulators to learn about defects that could be cropping up at plants all across the country. so far the lapses haven't led to significant accidents. so far. but this is going to give you chills. it has to do with the bp oil accident in the coast of mexico. what they found is a crucial valve called a blowout preventer didn't work. it was supposed to seal off the pipe when there's pressure. instead they got jammed and left a 1.4 inch space. and all 4.9 million barrels of oil gushed through that space. and that's what caused the worst oil spill in u.s. history. they found it wasn't bp's fault, but a flaw in the desig
fears in japan today as a 6.5 magnitude earthquake shook the region and triggered another tsunami alert there. the ground shaking alert extends to the crippled fukushima nuclear plant where experts are now saying they have found traces of plutonium in soil at that site. despite this, some people who live near the plant are now trying to return to their homes. disregarding government warnings about health risks in the evacuation zone. at the same time, the country's nuclear safety agency is rejecting a plea from green peace to expand the zone we were showing you after radiation was detected miles beyond it. meanwhile, in the belly of the fukushima plant, we watched that, radioactive water continues to build up there. the levels now measuring 100,000 times higher than normal, forcing workers now trying to control that situation to flee. nbc's lee cowan has the latest from too about what's being done about that walter. lee? >> reporter: morning, richard. it is all about the water, that water not only that's been flooding some of the buildings of the facility itself but also now we're told
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